Archive for the ‘Guerrilla Marketing’ Category

Guerrilla Selling’s Mind Map Challenge Revisited

September 12, 2011

While Guerrilla Selling’s “Mind Map” focuses on one-on-one direct sales interactions, can its face-to-face principles of buyers’ “phases” and sellers’ “best approaches” be effective in today’s online social media environment?

My Theory
In a B2B online social environment, without the requisite buyer’s presence in a face-to-face or one-on-one situation, practicing mind-map-driven guerrilla selling isn’t practical. My theory is that a seller can use his/her “Seller’s Approaches” – I view these as “behavior” — as triggers that cause a favorable response in a buyer audience. This flip-flops the original Mind Map chart, which teaches that the buyer’s behavior triggers the sellers reactive behavioral approach. For reference, I have included a slightly-modified version of the original Mind Map here.

The theory’s flip-flop premise is based on an online B2B audience of prospective buyers in which there are individuals, each of whom is in a particular identified left/right brain phase. If a seller were to address that audience with messages about “Fair-Care-Share” for example, the “Principle Phase” individual buyers would be responsive.  

In application, one might theorize that the six “best approaches” (disregarding the “Amoral Phase”) could be implemented in a series of blogs, Tweets, or other social media channels. By doing so, a seller could build – over time – a dynamic online personality profile that would appeal to more than one of the Mind Map’s categories of prospective buyers.

A Theoretical Example
For example, blog #1 portrays the seller as factual and logical, then blog #2 demonstrates fair-care-share aspects of the seller, while in blog #3 the seller is relaxed and just tells her/his story, and yet another blog (#4) stresses the seller’s responsibility to community and the good works his/her company is doing. This chameleon-like seller behavior is acknowledged in Chapter 4 of Guerrilla Selling. In the “Guerrilla Challenge” section, it teaches that “You must…adapt to the needs of each prospect you meet.” And, “They [Guerrillas] can shift from Ego to Pleaser to Authority to Principle phases as the situation requires.”

It would seem that the cumulative effect of such a blogging strategy could, over time, attract the identified Mind Map audience segments (as B2B leadgen). Similar-minded individuals in those segments would find the seller a person with whom a relationship might be formed.

The original Mind Map was reactive, i.e., the buyer’s behavior (phase) caused the guerilla seller to respond. It required an interactive situation, with a face-to-face meeting, or one-on-one (phone call).Today’s Internet reality is that in the online social communities, clearly identifying a particular individual’s phase is difficult, if not impossible. The Web’s social media tools are not equipped to provide face-to-face or one-on-one interactions. Therefore, a potential solution would be for the seller to behave online in more than one particular Mind Map phase, so as to attract (pull mode) compatible sales prospects.

Next Steps
My theory has not been tested in my real B2B (technology) world. I would be interested in your inputs. If feedback indicators are positive, I’d be willing to develop an alpha feasibility-validation program.

The Mind Map (Revisited)

The Mind Map is a model of behavior and personality that divides our human minds’ functions into seven “personality phases.” Guerrilla sellers use the map to understand people (prospects and customers) they encounter and be equipped to adopt a strategy that enables a relationship. At any given time, a particular person can shift from one mind phase to another.

Here are the Mind Map phases, listed with the most primitive “amoral” phase at the bottom:

Source:  Guerrilla Selling: Unconventional Weapons & Tactics
for Increasing Your Sales. William Gallagher, Orvel Ray Wilson,
and Jay Conrad Levinson, 1992. (http://www.gmarketing.com/)

The Benefits of Specs and Standards Marketing

May 21, 2010

I grew up in a technical environment. My Dad, a mechanical engineer, VP of Manufacturing for ITT Europe, and disciple of William Edwards Deming, was always reminding me about the importance of science and technology. (That’s probably why I wound up working in high tech and then founding MarkeTech.) Many years ago he sent me the following.

“How Specs Live Forever (author unknown)

“The U.S. Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and the U.S. railroads were built by English expatriates.

“Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that’s the gauge they used.

“Why did ‘they’ use that gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

“Okay! Why did the wagons use that odd wheel spacing? Well, if they tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on some of the old, long distance roads, because that’s the spacing of the old wheel ruts. 

“So who built these old rutted roads? The first long distance roads in Europe were built by Imperial Rome for the benefit of their legions. The roads have been used ever since. And the ruts?

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David v. Goliath: Specifications and Standards

March 30, 2010

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The underdog applies a little friendly guerrilla marketing.

I just put the finishing touches on a press release announcing one of our firm’s clients throwing its hat into the ring as a supporter of the federal government’s Virtual USA program. Writing the release was fraught with memories of one of my other involvements in getting a client’s technology into a government-mandated specification and global standard.

Those memories include traipsing all over the world from one spec meeting to another. Being up most of the night not because of jet lag, but putting the final touches on a specification document, updating a PowerPoint presentation, or lobbying spec leaders in a hotel bar.

The specification subject matter focused on global standards for passenger use of laptops on commercial aircraft. Virtual USA has similar implications, as a program that will standardize agency emergency response databases at all levels, from the local police and fire departments up to the FEMA and Department of Homeland Security level. Both specifications address issues of safety…ways to prevent an exploding laptop battery at 30,000 feet being analogous to emergency first responders having access to national databases via GIS (Geographic Information Systems) mapping software.

Another analog is that both clients are comparatively small fish, and both have IP and products that are (more…)


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